Roz Evans | BioBlitz Tremough
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he BioBlitz was a 24 hour survey of all of the flora and fauna on our University campus, with the aim of engaging the local community with biodiversity.

The BioBlitz was formed by myself and three others; Beth Roberts, Hannah Fitzjohn and Miranda Walter. We spent 8 months planning the event alongside our degrees, employing the help of over 50 volunteers on the day.

The event was a huge success, attracting over 300 members of the public and identiying over 270 species. Wildlife TV presenter Nick Baker attended on the day to help everyone find more species, he especially loved the creepy crawlies!

We won an award from our student union for the most innovative society project. I feel that event organisation is one of my strengths and something I would love to explore further.

Some of the main responsibilities of the role included:

  • Setting up the logistics of wildlife events including mammal trapping, bird ringing and moth trapping

  • Creating childrens wildlife themed games

  • Organising logistics and ordering appropriate equipment.

  • Securing funding through grant applications and liasing with staff in order to locate available resources.

  • Acquiring logos, banners and poster designs

  • Writing press releases

  • Safety assessments

  • Catering requirements

  • Creating rotas for volunteers

  • Inviting professional organisations such as Cornwall Wildlife Trust and the National Trust.

Picture credit to Jacky Poon and Kevin Murphy.

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